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Cherry scones, regular or allergy-free

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Cherry scones, regular or allergy-free
Scones are a nice breakfast treat or dessert. And they're easy to make!

Scones are a nice breakfast treat or dessert. And they're easy to make!

Scones aren’t something I think about often. They are kind of a fringe breakfast item, at least where I live. With so many bagel and donut shops, and the convenience of waffles you can put in your toaster at home, scones really don’t rank as a popular baked good.

But they should! They are easy to make, and the ingredients are simple. I cook and bake for my family with various food allergies and intolerances, and scones are something you can make the traditional way or adapted with alternative ingredients.

I came across a recipe for scones in a recent issue of Coastal Living magazine, which I pore over every month. So I can’t say this is one of my own original recipes as I usually post. But I adapted it for my family’s food allergies and intolerances. (I also tweaked it and made a batch of scones with regular all-purpose flour for friends.) The good thing is you don’t need eggs to make scones, so if you can’t eat them, this is a great recipe to try. I even got complimented on my gluten-free scones by someone I don’t even know!

Ingredients

2-1/2 cups flour (I used King Arthur gluten-free)
1/2 cup sugar
2 tsp. baking powder (look for corn-free if corn is an issue for you, or try this recipe)
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1/2 cup butter at room temperature (I used a non-dairy butter substitute one time and organic shortening another)
handful of dried tart cherries
1/2 cup milk (I used vanilla coconut milk)
2 tsp. vanilla (look for gluten-free vanilla)
powdered sugar (look for organic, or make your own, to avoid corn)

Directions

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Add the butter and cut in with a knife and fork until it becomes part of the flour mixture. (The original recipe calls for a food processor to mix.) Add the vanilla and milk. (The original recipe uses more milk, but I found less milk made a better dough texture.) Mix the batter just until it’s combined, then fold in the cherries. (Traditionally, currants are used. You can add anything to your scones. I have even added chocolate chips and cashews!)

Shape the scone dough into a flat, round disc. I found a plate to be a helpful guide.

I placed my scone dough on a dinner plate to cut them before baking

I placed my scone dough on a dinner plate to cut them before baking

Cut the scone dough into eight triangles, then use a pie server or spatula to transfer them to a baking sheet. If you like smaller scones, create two smaller discs, then slice.

Bake the scones at 300 degrees F for about 30 minutes. (The original recipe calls for 375 for 25 minutes, but at this temperature I felt my scones got overbaked.) You may want to adjust the temperature for yourself and check on the scones’ golden-brownness.

Once they’re out of the oven, dust them with powdered sugar.

A sprinkle of powdered sugar when the scones come out of the oven give them appeal and a touch of sweetness

A sprinkle of powdered sugar when the scones come out of the oven give them appeal and a touch of sweetness

If you want to create a glaze for your scones instead, add a little milk to some powdered sugar and drizzle or pour it over the scones.

Scones are great when they are warm out of the oven, but they also keep well for a couple days in an airtight container.

Makes 8 regular-sized scones, or 16 mini scones.

Serve up your scones!

Serve up your scones!

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